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What’s Wrong With Government Regulated Food Guides?

 

Is questioning convention too much for mainstream media? This article was rejected from The Huffington Post and we're not sure why. If they ever tell us, we'll let you know.

Do you look down at your dinner and see 680 calories? Perhaps a healthy ratio of carbs to proteins to fats? Maybe you see some fibre, vitamin C, beta carotene and just the right amount of Omega 3’s.

This is weird right? Looking at a plate of food without actually seeing the food.

Of course it is beneficial to bring awareness and mindfulness to our eating, but the counting, weighing, ratios and isolated nutrients turns our meal into a math challenge rather than the enjoyable nourishing endeavor it once was.

Let’s just discard all we know of the Canada Food Guide, or any other trendy diet. We don’t need a chart to determine what we should be eating. Intuitively we already know.

These generally accepted, mass-market-approved nutritional guidelines are recommended by doctors and dietitians, taught in schools, and fully supported (and sponsored) by the milk board, cow farmers, grain farmers and food industrialists. But do they work? Are we healthier now than we were 50 years ago, before we had these guidelines to follow? Our general attitude around food has become neurotic and a very confusing preoccupation.  Our health is suffering for it.

Here are two words that might change the rest of your life: Whole Foods.

I am not referring to the grocery store, but to the most basic, most natural form of food; foods that managed to bypass the chemistry lab and processing factory, making as few stops as possible in the shortest distance between the land on which it grew and the plate that sits before us. These are foods that have the goodness intactall present in the healthiest of ratios as they naturally occurred in nature.

To fully regain and maintain our health, there is no better guide than our inherent wisdom. We know what good food is. Relying on health claims and food labels hasn’t been working. If what we're doing isn't getting us the results we're after, perhaps it's time to change the approach. It is really that simple. It's not about measuring the micro or macro nutrient proportions, calories and subbing in fat-free or sugar-free/chemical-rich foods. Eating whole foods, a variety of whole grains, fruits and veggies, nuts and seeds, beans and lentils and leans meats, poultry, fish and eggs if desired, will be the last diet anyone needs to try.

When the body gets all it needs to heal, repair, recover and build, the natural state of optimum health and vitality is the inevitable result!

14 Responses to “What’s Wrong With Government Regulated Food Guides?”

  1. Love this. @meghantelpner Yep- we're challenging Canada's Food guide. Mainly because it's just advertising: http://t.co/JIKpmarB
  2. Common sense!! RT @meghantelpner: Yep- we're challenging Canada's Food guide. Mainly because it's just advertising: http://t.co/oZK9V4M2
  3. T said…
    ha! Love it!!
  4. Food guides really don't provide too much healthy guidance if you ask me http://t.co/zEp6p8PZ
  5. xo! she doesn't mince words! RT @meghantelpner Food guides really don't provide too much healthy guidance if you ask me http://t.co/ylqF5vqw
  6. Bravo, well said! Huffington post's loss on a great article.
  7. karen napper said…
    You are so right Meghan. Thanks for bringing this issue forth!
  8. Jenny said…
    While I agree with the premise of your article, I also agree with Huffington Post's decision not to accept it. You diss doctors, dietitians and a host of other people who you think solely rely on the Canadian Food Guide. Just as you don't rely on one kind of diet to inform your nutrition ethos, many licensed dietary/nutrition professionals also make recommendations garnered from a variety of sources for their clients - not just from the food guide. I doubt you appreciate blanket statements made about holistic nutritionists and I'm pretty sure doctors and licensed dietitians feel the same about blanket statements applied to their professions. So maybe HuffPo doesn't want to piss off some of its other health/medical writers. But I think we all know one of the biggest reasons why they likely turned it down. Huffington Post/AOL relies on corporate sponsors and advertising for revenue. Given that HuffPo has yet to turn into a moneymaker, they can't risk losing advertising revenue from major food/beverage companies. Like I said, I fully agree with what you wrote. It just wasn't the appropriate venue for it.
    • Meghan Telpner said…
      Yep. You are probably right. Though if the blanket statements about docs and dietitians was the only problem- I imagine that one line could have been edited. The issue was clearly larger. I appreciate your view and insight.
  9. Don't let food guides tell you what to put on your plate! http://t.co/lPC6zcjc
  10. @meghantelpner asks: "What's wrong with government-regulated food guides?" Check it out: http://t.co/BgjSvTHj

Before you post your comment, please note that I am unable to offer nutritional advice or recommendations via my blog.

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